Blown-out Twist-out

This is by far my favorite to-go-to hairstyle in the spring and fall, when the weather is warm and dry. I simply, blow dry my hair, my goal is not bone straight blown out hair, but just stretched hair. A heat protectant and small amount of leave-in was applied before blowdrying my hair. Next I put my hair in big chunky flat twists and unravel the next day. I enjoy this style, because it’s soft and fluffy. I get to enjoy the length of my hair for a bit. In addition, this style lasts longer than my wet/damp set twists, typically 10 – 14 days. I follow-up by oiling my ends each night and placing my hair back in jumbo twists. Love the versatility of natural hair!

I’m mostly doing my usual routine (clay wash, occasional slippery elm detangle, deep conditioning and sealing with oil and for the most part skipping the leave-in). This week, I started with a new practice and that’s oiling my scalp before I wash my hair. I’ll post on that soon.Have you ever oiled your scalps, is it part of your regimen?

blwtwt

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Twisted Twist Out Feat. Slippery Elm and Dry Deep Conditioning

Happy Spring. Hope you’re all enjoying milder weather, blooming trees and longer days.

I’m no hair styling queen and rarely post on styling. However, I’ve found a twist-out method that I had to share. So there are different twist out techniques. I’ve used two on my hair. 1. The two strand twist. This is simple. You take two pieces of hair, wind them round and round from the roots to the tips. 2. The flat twist. This one is a little more involved, you take small sections of hair and twist them from root to tip, incorporating more as you work your way down. Kind of like a french braid, but a twist instead. I find method 1 is faster and easier for novices like myself. The latter method takes times, but yields more defined  results than the first.

Since, I’m low on time, I typically do two strand twists. Recently, I accidentally enhanced this style. I don’t have pictures or a video, but it’s quite easy to explain. You put your hair in twists. Let it air dry, or as I prefer partially dry under a hooded dryer. You then wind/twist the twisted hair around from root almost to then ends, but not all the way down (to reduce manipulation on the ends of your hair), pin the twisted twists, in place with a hair pin, so they don’t unwind. This method results in a more defined and stretched twist out. When you’re twisting your twists, it’s a similar motion to making a bantu knot, but not as tight.

Another new technique I’m using to get a different  style and more defined look counter clockwise twisting (just made the name up). I twist towards my face, so the curls go forward rather than off my face. I like the final look a lot more than my usual twisting direction.

Finally, I’m loving my short on time, dry deep conditioning routine. My hair is still very moisturized and it’s a great alternative to rhassoul. Here’s what I do:

  1. Apply a deep conditioner mix. This week it was coconut milk, Giovanni deeper moisture, a few drops coconut oil and honey.
  2. Sit under a dryer for 20 – 30 minutes.
  3. While conditioner is still in my hair, shampoo my hair. Rinse.
  4. Apply my slippery elm mixture, apply some consitioner on top of that (Aussie Moist, this week) and detangle.

I then sealed my hair with jojoba oil and applied leave-in to my ends.

Here’s the final result.

Now to you, I’m curious… Have you ever used slippery elm? What’s your favorite stretched style?

Shiny Beach Waves

So, if you follow my blog, you know that I’m experiencing postpartum shedding. I’m not letting it get me down, as dramatic as I sounded in the earlier post. It’s just a phase and I know it’ll pass. The past couple of days, I tried pulling out shed hairs every day. This has reduced tangling, matting and frizz.

Friday night I decided to give my hair a thorough cleanse. I was long overdue for a wash. I decided to do a semi-clarifying shampoo with Giovanni Triple Treat Shampoo. This time I tried something different and put conditioner on my soaking wet ends, then proceeded to shampoo my scalp. I gave my scalp a vigorous scrub with the pads of my fingers to break up dirt and build-up. Shampooing my conditioned hair made detangling easier and left my hair more moisturized– win-win situation! After this I put on Aussie Moist 3 Minute Repair (amazing deep conditioner, btw) and added coconut oil on top of this (see posts: 1, 2 ,3 on reverse oil rinsing). My shed hairs of course flowed down the drain like a stream of water, but better out of my hair than tangled in my hair. Note: since I’m experiencing extreme shedding, I’m back to washing my hair in 4 sections. It makes detangling more manageable.

For the styling phase, I simply applied a generous amount of KCKT leave-in and applied Garnier Fructis Sleek and Shine. My sister forgot her bottle here on her last visit, so I just decided to give it a try. After this, I installed four chunky twists in each section. This is my lazy, wavy twist out method….fewer twists and less time (see post on Beach Waves). I then sat under my hooded dryer to let the leave-in penetrate and dry my hair half-way. The next day, I was left with a less frizzier look than usual and my hair was remarkably shinier. My hair has been quite dull the past couple of weeks. I credit the shiny results this week to: the clarifier, meticulously removing all my shed hairs, reverse oil rinsing and perhaps the Garnier Fructis Sleek and Shine. I’ll give this method another try to see if I get the same results.

The weeks prior, because I was low on time, I tried co-washing for two weeks. I don’t know why I never learn my lesson, but co-washing just doesn’t yield good results for me. I guess I’m always revisiting past routines that failed in hopes that it suddenly will work again. Do you find yourself too trying things again that consistently yielded poor results in the past?

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1 week old twist out

So I wanted to leave my twists in for two weeks…that didn’t happen. I made it to one week, so not bad. I’m going to try to make the twist out hold me over for another week. My hair is super stretched from bunning. Hmm maybe it’s time to revisit flexirods.

I do notice that my hair is über-moisturized as a result of leaving the twists in one week instead of one day. Like so moisturized, I can rub my hand in my hair and then moisturize my hands lol! #Nosoulglothough (Coming to America reference makes me feel so old).

On another note I keep finding random twists in my hair, so I didn’t take them all out obviously. #densehairproblems

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End of oil rinsing?

Just a quick conclusion on my oil rinsing trials. I’m en route to France for my summer holiday, so am updating from my phone:

Likes:
❤Shine
❤Slip/ detangling ease
❤Softness
❤Awesome day 1 hair
❤My hair feels stronger
❤Less shedding

Dislikes:
💔Frizzy hair by day 3
💔 Requires me to re-moisturize my hair twice before my next wash day (vs not at all or once)
💔 Dull appearance by day 3

Will I try (reverse) oil rinsing again? If yes, will I make it part of my regimen?

I will definitely try reverse oil rinsing again. However, it won’t be a weekly part of my regimen. Perhaps I’ll do it once per month or once every other month. I won’t exclude it entirely, as I think it has some great benefits. However, weekly oil rinses are too much for my low porosity hair.

So I’ll continue with my regular routine (see my regimen) and throw this in the mix occasionally.

Last night I simply co-washed my hair and rinsed out all conditioner. Followed that with KCKT, 8-10 big twists (didn’t seal or add any oil). I took them down this morning. They were a bit damp, but I had a train to catch. In any case, I did notice my hair felt stronger, softer and looked somewhat shinier than my pre-oil rinsing hair… Not sure if that’s due to my prior trials with the oil or not…

That’s all for now! Looking forward to a relaxing holiday. Hoping for a little seaside humidity, my hair seems to thrive in that kind of climate.

Any fun vacation plans for the summer?

Xo

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